Candied Jalapenos AKA Cowboy Candy RECIPE (Water Bath Canned or Refrigerated)

Sweet with spice, and everything nice. This condiment has it all. It is one of the most high-in-demand canned goods that I make (the other being pickled jalapeno slices). You can pop the candied jalapenos right into the refrigerator if you intend to gobble them up quickly, or water bath can them for shelf stability – I provide directions for both options below. I do not include this recipe in either of my cookbooks (Can It & Ferment It or WECK Small-Batch Preserving), so I’m sharing my version here.

I first made this recipe about 6 years ago and of course I cannot find the recipe I used anywhere. I have scanned all my preserving cookbooks and looked all over the internet, and the closest recipe I found to the original I made is written by Rebecca Lindamood. I tweaked her recipe quite a bit, so I am sharing the recipe with my adjustments incorporated. Enjoy!

Candied Jalapenos AKA Cowboy Candy

Yield: about 6-7 jelly jars (8 oz jars)

Ingredients:

16 cups sliced jalapenos (about 3 pounds whole jalapenos)

Syrup:

1.5 cups apple cider vinegar (organic)

4 cups organic or non-GMO sugar

1/2 tsp. ground turmeric powder

1/2 tsp. celery seed

1 tbsp. granulated garlic powder

Directions:

Wash jalapenos, remove stems (discard). Slice jalapeno peppers 1/4-1/8″ thick, and collect them in a large bowl. In a nonreactive pot, bring the syrup ingredients together and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer and stir until all of the sugar has dissolved. Carefully add all jalapeno slices to the syrup, stir together, and turn heat back up to a boil. Boil for a minimum of 5 minutes. I prefer to “over-cook” my jalapenos until they begin to shrivel (this can take 15+ minutes). Determine length of cook time based upon your personal preference. I like the jalapenos shriveled a bit because I prefer the texture that way.

IF YOU HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH WATER BATH CANNING, FOLLOW THESE DIRECTIONS: Ladle the hot syrup and pepper slices into warm, prepared canning jars, leaving 1/4″ head space. I find it easiest to attempt to scoop mostly jalapeno slices into the jars (a slotted spoon can be useful here), and then go back and top off syrup where needed (that way you avoid a jar of syrup with few slices). Use a stainless steel butter knife or other clean tool to removed any air bubbles trapped within the peppers and the side of the jar. As the syrup settles, you may need to add in more syrup.

Wipe the rims of the jars with a dampened, clean, lint-free cloth or paper towel and again with a dry towel. Place the lid with sealing compound side down, in place over the rim of each jar and carefully twist the canning ring on the jar until it’s just-snug on the jar. Process in the boiling water bath for 10 minutes (15 minutes if using pint jars instead). Carefully remove the jars from the water bath with the canning tongs and place jars on a towel-lined surface for 12 hours without touching.

Store in the refrigerator after breaking the seal.

**If you do not have experience with canning, I fully explain the method in Can It & Ferment It. Or, you can skip the hot water bath canning step and fill jars with the jalapenos and syrup, cover with lid and ring and allow the jars to cool on a towel-lined surface. Once cooled, store in the refrigerator and eat within 2 months.

I serve this condiment with crackers and goat cheese. Though, these jalapenos are a good addition to just about anything you can dream up. 🙂

Feel free to message me with any questions.

 

 

 

It’s Fresh Cranberry Season in Minnesota!

Fermented Cranberry Relish from Can It & Ferment It, by Stephanie Thurow

Cranberry season in Minnesota is almost as exciting to me as apple season is for most home cooks. Why? Because they are so incredibly versatile. Most people initially think “cranberry sauce” or, if you were really lucky growing up (like me!), you’ll think of that canned cranberry sauce that falls out of the can, molded into the shape of the can — mmmm, appetizing 😉 . But, cranberries can be used for so much more than just the traditional cranberry sauce. They are delicious dehydrated, juiced, used in holiday cocktails (or mocktails), made into chutney, jams, jellies and salsas, or even a relish. Cranberries are also healthy! They are high in antioxidants, low in calories, good for the urinary system and they are high in vitamins C, A and K.

Plus, when you live right next to the state that produces the largest crop of cranberries in the country, and supplies nearly half the world with them — thank you, Wisconsin –, you may as well embrace the beautiful, vibrant, red gems.

Beginning in October, us Minnesotans start to see fresh cranberries trickle in at the markets. Yay! Lakewinds Food Co-op in Richfield offers them seasonally as well as the Downtown St. Paul –  Lowertown Farmers’ Market. They are inexpensive and incredibly delicious.

I already purchased my first box of 10 pounds and have made a double batch of cranberry sauce for the holiday season, as well as a new recipe I’m working on for Cranberry Coulis.

Here is a recipe that I developed for FERMENTED CRANBERRY-ORANGE RELISH, published in Can It & Ferment It (2017), Skyhorse Publishing, Inc. I hope you give it a try!

This sweet and citrusy cranberry ferment is full of flavor. The deep red color of the finished fermented relish will surely brighten up any plate!

Yield: 1 pint jar

Ingredients:

3 cups whole fresh cranberries

½ tsp. organic orange zest

2 tbsp. fresh squeezed orange juice

2 tbsp. raw honey

Directions:

Pick through the cranberries and discard any damaged, soft or unripe berries (pink or green colored). Rinse thoroughly and strain. Use a food processor to chop the cranberries; it will only take 2-3 seconds. Transfer the berries into a pint jar and add in the orange zest, juice and honey. Mix together well. Use a canning jar lid and ring to tightly shut the jar.

Keep the relish on the counter at room temperature, preferably between 68-75°F to ferment. Once a day, open the jar, stir the ingredients, pat them back down and tightly shut the jar. This is a 3-day ferment. Once complete, refrigerate relish for up to two weeks. Enjoy!

I have many more recipes for cranberries in Can It & Ferment It as well as WECK Small-Batch Preserving.

Can It and Ferment It – Canning and Fermenting Class in Minnesota

Last month I taught a 2.5 hour cooking class about canning and fermenting to 10 local adults. It was a lot of information to squeeze into a short time frame, but we managed to do it.

I taught the class all about the canning process, terminology and the materials needed and then they got to get hands-on in the kitchen. Each student cleaned, prepped, packed and water bath canned their own pint of colorful carrot pickles. I brought a variety of spices for them to add to their jars including fresh garlic clove, black peppercorns, coriander, pickling spice mix, crushed red pepper flakes and dried dill seed. Each student seasoned their jars to their liking. Once everyone’s jars were water bath processed, they cleaned up and we started the second part of class.

For the next portion of class, I briefly talked about the process of fermentation and the benefits of fermenting food. I explained the different terminology and the various fermentation vessel option. Then, the students got to once again get hands-on by packing their own pints of cherry tomatoes with basil and garlic and made a salt-water brine to ferment them in. I also provided each student with a little WECK jar glass lid to use as a weight, as they are the perfect size for small-batch jar fermenting.


At the end of the class, I shared some canned and fermented goodies that I had made, so the students could taste a variety of things. You never know what to expect when you get a group of strangers together, but each person was a fantastic addition to the class. Everyone had a great time and I look forward to the sauerkraut-making and fire cider classes I’m developing for the winter session!

To get on an e-mail list to be notified of future canning and fermenting classes in the Twin Cities, shoot me an e-mail at:  minnesotafromscratch(at)gmail(dot)com with the subject “Future Classes”

Thanks,

Stephanie

 

What is a Certified Master Food Preserver and How Do You Become One?

Certified Master Food Preserver Graduates (and instructors on the ends) – Summer 2018 ~Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

I’ve received so many messages and e-mails from people asking where they can take a class like I took in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii this past June (2018), so here are some answers. The Master Food Preserver course is offered ALL OVER the place, but unfortunately Minnesota and Wisconsin have cancelled their courses for now and that’s why I went to Hawaii. Other states around the country are also phasing it out, due to “lack of funding”. This seems like an essential course to have, especially for us Midwesterner’s, that live in a frozen tundra for a good chunk of the year. There is nothing like cracking open a jar of food preserved in the summer when it’s the dead of winter, I tell ya….

But, before I get ahead of myself, let’s talk about what a Certified Master Food Preserver is. A Master Food Preserver (MFP) is someone that has completed the intensive certification course (usually offered) through the Extension Service in their county. They have received in-depth training of up-to-date USDA-approved methods of food preservation for preserving food safely and successfully at home. A MFP must also have a desire to teach others how to preserve, because a MFP is required to volunteer 40+ hours (varies per program) within their community each year and teach others how to preserve food. Each program is a bit different, varying from county to county. For example, Maine offers a course that is 10 Fridays in a row and New York offers the course in 3 days, back-to-back.

The course I took in Kona was spread out over 3 weekends, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, so I had to go to Kona for 2.5 weeks — OH, SHUCKS ;). Though the class layout and the cost of the class varies location by location, the material taught should pretty much be the same. At the end of the course, there is a long test with multiple choice, fill in the blank and essay questions (they gave us 4 hours to complete it) and as part of passing our class, we even had to present a 20-minute demo in front of our class and instructors, on which we were graded. Oh, and we had quizzes every night too and there was tons of reading and hands on kitchen time. It was A LOT OF WORK but I loved every single minute of it.

Why did I want to become a MFP? Well, because I teach people how to can and ferment pretty much every day. I write books about it and I want to learn everything I can possibly can so I can be an even better resource for YOU. Plus, the course not only teaches you about water bath canning and fermenting, but also goes into topics that I’m not as well versed in, such as dehydrating, pressure canning, freezing and charcuterie. It also has a large emphasis on food safety and proper food handling to avoid food borne illnesses (which is completely avoidable by the way!).

So, how do you become one? I’d start with a general search on google. See what comes up near you. If you need to travel a state or two, be sure to check with the director of the course to make sure you are allowed to attend before purchasing the class.

If you have any questions I didn’t answer, post in the comments and I’ll get back to you!

If you missed my blog posts about being in Hawaii, here is my summary of Week 1 and my summary of Week 2.

To be notified of future food preservation classes in the Twin Cities, please e-mail me at: minnesotafromscratch(at)gmail(dot)com with the subject line “Future Classes”.

Can It & Ferment It – A Year in Review and Look Ahead

July 18th, 2018 marks the one year anniversary of when my first cookbook, Can It & Ferment It was published. Never having written a book before, I had no idea what to expect when I signed my first book deal. The time spent writing, cooking, recipe developing, taking photos, editing, etc… is impossible for me to measure. It took hundreds upon hundreds of hours of work and thousands of dollars to create. I never really thought about how much work went into a cookbook before writing one.

When it was time for my book to finally release, I was nearly petrified at what everyone would think. Would it be well-received? Did I forget an ingredient or direction? Were my photos good enough? The night before release I was almost sick with nerves over it, I wished I could some how make it stop. Then, the day of release, the book didn’t even ship out to all my pre-orderers because it sold out upon release! Had all my wishing for it not to release come true? My editor said she hadn’t experienced that with a book before. Suddenly, I was more eager than ever for my book to get into everyone’s hands… I needed to end the suspense already! Within a couple weeks, reviews of my book started to trickle in. Bloggers posted reviews, messages popped up in my inbox with praise and I started to receive feedback – and you know what? It was good! Why had I been so afraid? I suppose that’s a normal reaction to the unknown.

Now a year later, I have hundreds of photos that people have posted, of recipes from my book that they have made and liked, or even LOVED! I have made so many friends all over the world, online and in person. The best feedback is that people feel I have written an easy to understand cookbook that explains the methods of water bath canning and fermentation without being too wordy, too technical or too overwhelming and that was my goal. Food preservation is something that everyone that has a desire to do, should have a chance to learn – and I’m happy to teach. I get messages almost daily, most days multiple messages, of people asking questions or wanting advice and I LOVE THAT! I am happy to be a resource, so please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I am most easily reachable on Instagram FYI (@minnesotafromscratch).

Here are some pictures my readers have posted online of recipes they have made from Can It & Ferment It!

Anyway, reaching the one year mark of my release has me thinking a lot about the past year and all that has happened.

Here are some highlights from the last year:

Our local newspaper put my interview on the front page of the paper! 🙂

 

Reminisce Magazine added Can It & Ferment It to the SPOTLIGHT section of their magazine!

 

Make It Minnesota invited me to guest contribute to the kitchen section of their DRIVEN magazine. Full digital copy here: https://issuu.com/makeitminnesota/docs/mim-vol2-no2-digital-edition

I had an awesome book release party with family, close friends and some new friends too. Read my blog post about the launch party here: https://minnesotafromscratch.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/can-it-ferment-it-release-and-book-launch-party/

 

I hung out at the St Paul Farmer’s Market – Lowertown, met some readers and gave away some books!

 

I had a meet-and-greet at Lakewinds Co op in Richfield and got to meet friends from social media!

 

Harris Farmer’s Almanac chose Can It & Ferment It to turn into a magazine as their annual special “canning” magazine!

 

The owner of Golden Fig brought Can It & Ferment It on her pickling segment of Twin Cities Live! Full video here: http://twincitieslive.com/article/stories/s4986749.shtml?cat=10692

 

I had the opportunity to become a Certified Master Food Preserver in Kona, Hawaii

Here are a list of other media and blogs that wrote about Can It & Ferment It:

Also, within the last year, I also managed to write my second book, WECK Small-Batch Preserving: Year-Round Recipes for Canning, Fermenting, Pickling and More. My new book is currently on pre-sale and will release on Sept 4th, 2018. In this book, I teach you all about the beautiful variety of WECK jars and different ways to utilize them. The WECK company has been around for nearly 120 years and their jars are wildly used all over the world, but especially in Europe. Being that the jar and lid are both glass, it makes them completely non-toxic (no chemicals leach into your preserves) and that’s what initially drew me to them over 10 years ago. In this book I have written water bath canned recipes, fermented recipes and even some infusion recipes. I included lots of colorful photos and “notes sections” on nearly every recipes and in the back of the book, as I did in Can It & Ferment It. Fortunately, I am not experiencing the nerves I did with my first book release; I am eager and excited for this one the hit the market! I definitely don’t want summer to end, but Sept 4th can’t come soon enough.

Throughout the rest of the summer and into the fall, I will be doing several meet-and-greets around the Twin Cities as well as teaching some classes in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Keep an eye on my social media for updates and class notifications.

Connect with me:

Twitter: @StephLovestoCan

Facebook: Minnesota from Scratch Blog Page

Instagram: @minnesotafromscratch

In celebration of the one year anniversary of the publication of Can It & Ferment It, I’ve collaborated with my favorite fermentation crock shop, Stone Creek Trading to giveaway a gorgeous, handmade 5L crock! The giveaway is posted over on my Instagram account and ends today (7/19/18), so hurry over and get entered to win.

Thanks for a wonderful year!

(function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){ (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o), m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m) })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga'); ga('create', 'UA-41549617-1', 'wordpress.com'); ga('send', 'pageview');